Opsis Therapeutics
Normal Vision

Retinal Diseases

Diseases that cause degeneration of the retina have created a major unmet medical need that is continuing to grow as the population ages. In the US alone, the economic burden of vision loss is estimated at $139 billion per year, and vision loss is ranked among the top ten causes of disability. For the majority of retinal diseases, patients have few or no treatment options.

Normal Vision

Normal Vision

A healthy retina provides for sharp visual acuity and color discrimination, functions needed for many activities such as reading, driving, and recognizing faces. During the course of a retinal disease, visual acuity can be compromised in different ways. Vision loss from selected retinal diseases is simulated in the images below.

(Photo by Phil Roeder)

Macular Degeneration

Macular Degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of permanent impairment of central vision, and the main cause of legal blindness in developed countries. It is estimated that by 2020 nearly 3 million Americans aged 40 years and older will be afflicted with AMD. There are no treatments for the most common form of the disease, Dry AMD.

(Photo modified by Mark Dambach)

Retinitis Pigmentosa

Retinitis Pigmentosa

Retinitis pigmentosa and its related disorders are the leading cause of inherited blindness, which usually is first diagnosed in infants, children and/or young adults. An estimated 1 in 4,000 people have the disease, corresponding to about 100,000 patients in the US. Most patients are legally blind by age 40. Gene therapy has recently shown promise for treatment of certain forms of the disease. However there are no available therapies for the majority of patients.

(Photo modified by Mark Dambach)

Retinal Detachment

Retinal Detachment

Retinal detachment is an acquired condition where the retina peels away from its normal position as a result of a trauma to the eye. Within the United States there are approximately 28,000 cases of retinal detachment per year. Surgical re-attachment is a routine procedure that is usually effective, although in certain cases the detachment persists too long, causing permanent damage to the retina.

(Photo modified by Mark Dambach)